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 From: Boudewijn Lutgerink
  Where is Boudewijn Lutgerink?
 Hoonaardstraat, Driel
 Netherlands
 Boudewijn Lutgerink
 To: Mike Yearwood
  Where is Mike Yearwood?
 Toronto
 Canada
 Mike Yearwood
 Tags
Subject: RE: Should newbies learn only best practices
Thread ID: 170802 Message ID: 171480 # Views: 42 # Ratings: 3
Version: Not Applicable Category: Projects and Design
Date: Monday, May 05, 2008 9:42:49 AM         
   


> Hi all
>
> I have had this thought on occassion. I suspect many of you will disagree with me. It seems to me that a newbie should not learn everything about a given programming language. As time goes by, I've found I use fewer and fewer different techniques and commands. For example, I can't remember when was the last SET FILTER I applied in a new VFP production system.
>
> I could use ADIR to read a directory but there is a limit on the array size and with enough files ADIR would crash, so I choose SYS(2000) over ADIR.
>
> I could use pessimistic row buffering, but as Andy Kramek so wisely noted, Optimistic Table Buffering is all we need.
>
> There's been this belief that we must crawl before we can run, but that only applies to infants.
>
> I've seen many on the boards start with a chunk of code that may or may not work and get a solution that is more advanced and they seem to implement it. Why did they start off on the "wrong" foot? This can't be good for business, right?
>
> Curious to see your comments.
>
> Mike Yearwood
>
>
>

Interesting question Mike,

My starting point for each and every training I do is that the techniques should be immediately useful.
This way my students can use the technique immediately after training.

BTW, therefore my training NEVER is a full x day course in one block.
I train them a certain technique, have them work with it for a week, evaluate any problems the next training day, teach something new THAT ADDS to the previously trained technique etc...

In the week following the training they also receive two e-mails from me.
The first within 24 hours, summarizing the things they learned and how it can be applied in their specific situation.

The next they receive one workingday before I come to the site for the next training, telling what we trained in the last session and telling them what we are going to work on in the next training-session, asking them to write down as many notes about the new subject they can think of. (this is a technique to prepare their mindset for the new stuff.)

One other thing I do BEFORE I even train them is to have a long session with them, getting to know them, so I know where their interest is (in work and private).
I visit the company, see the dept they work, the kind of work they do within that company and so on.

From that I find things I can relate to when teaching something.

I do agree with you that learning best practice from falling down and getting up is "somewhat expensive" and not good for the business. Even further I dare to say that with the availability of information on best practices on the internet this is an absolute useless approach.

I also agree that one does not have to know everything about a certain programming language.
Therefore, what I do when i train ppl, is that I ALWAYS first learn them the MMOST study methodology (Mind Mapping Organic Study Technique) along with speed and range reading.

These two techniques, that have nothing to do really with programming can be applied to nearly everything you have to read and learn in daily life.

Then the next thing I learn them is requirement gathering ( read Robertson and Robertson, the requirements process)

The next thing I teach then is design patterns. Most of it I take from Gamma, Helm, Johnson and Vlissides.
Taking live situations from the trainee's situation, looking at some of the patterns, weighing pro's and con's and ultimately selecting the best applicable technique for the given situation.
With that technique in mind we then take a look at the richness of the language, see what functions, commands etc can be applied.

This way, so is my experience, the new techniques will stay in the minds of those I train.
And to oppose with what Samir Ibrahim claims, putting an idea in somebody's head does NOT restrict that person. Given that this idea is not restictive by itself.


Boudewijn LutgeĀ®ink
http://www.vfpdevelopers-online.com
The truth will set you free, Ken knew the truth!

COMPLETE THREAD

Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/1/2008 1:57:41 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by tushar @ 5/1/2008 2:49:04 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/1/2008 3:27:31 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Christof Wollenhaupt @ 5/1/2008 4:40:20 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by William Sanders @ 5/1/2008 4:50:10 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/1/2008 6:39:21 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/1/2008 11:23:37 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/2/2008 1:14:59 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/2/2008 1:58:41 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/2/2008 3:42:16 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Glenn Villar @ 5/2/2008 11:37:11 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/3/2008 12:03:32 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/3/2008 6:57:02 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Christian Tabligan @ 5/5/2008 4:02:14 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by John Reviews @ 5/5/2008 6:38:09 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Christian Tabligan @ 5/5/2008 7:02:26 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by William Sanders @ 5/2/2008 6:29:32 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/3/2008 4:22:09 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Ilya Rabyy @ 5/2/2008 12:12:31 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/2/2008 1:22:25 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Randy Bosma @ 5/2/2008 4:21:07 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Ilya Rabyy @ 5/2/2008 5:06:55 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Randy Bosma @ 5/5/2008 11:43:29 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Pete Sass @ 5/2/2008 1:25:42 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Randy Bosma @ 5/2/2008 5:01:27 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/2/2008 5:44:43 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Cetin Basoz @ 5/3/2008 12:07:24 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/3/2008 6:30:52 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Cetin Basoz @ 5/3/2008 10:53:01 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/3/2008 11:07:43 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/3/2008 4:37:47 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/4/2008 1:34:59 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/4/2008 2:05:59 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/4/2008 5:50:09 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Boudewijn Lutgerink @ 5/5/2008 9:12:13 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Boudewijn Lutgerink @ 5/5/2008 9:10:38 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Cetin Basoz @ 5/5/2008 9:14:17 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Samir Ibrahim @ 5/3/2008 5:39:41 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/3/2008 6:21:40 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Samir Ibrahim @ 5/5/2008 8:58:34 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Boudewijn Lutgerink @ 5/5/2008 10:14:59 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/3/2008 11:31:03 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/4/2008 1:33:58 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/4/2008 6:03:20 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/4/2008 3:51:13 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/4/2008 11:02:46 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by John Reviews @ 5/5/2008 6:47:30 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Christian Tabligan @ 5/5/2008 7:31:53 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Boudewijn Lutgerink @ 5/5/2008 9:42:49 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/5/2008 1:53:21 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/5/2008 2:05:18 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Olaf Doschke @ 5/5/2008 9:39:50 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/6/2008 4:31:20 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Olaf Doschke @ 5/6/2008 2:54:22 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/6/2008 3:34:22 PM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Jun Tangunan @ 5/6/2008 1:26:15 AM
RE: Should newbies learn only best practices Posted by Mike Yearwood @ 5/6/2008 4:23:08 AM